Posts Tagged: Colchuck Lake

January 24, 2011 – Larches near Colchuck Lake

Larches above Colchuck Lake

Larches above Colchuck Lake

Monday, January 24, 2011

http://davefry.net/rate/index.php?viewimage=1927

Hello, welcome back from the weekend! I was hoping that I’d be able to make it out this weekend to take some new pics, because it’s been awhile now since I’ve been able to get anything worthy of tossing up in this blog. But, no, the weather didn’t really work out, yet again. Sigh. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve still got plenty queued up in the backlog to last awhile. But still, it would be nice to get some new ones. I mean, the whole point of a hobby is that it it’s an activity that you enjoy. So I miss it, and that’s sad. Oh well, hopefully someday soon.

In the meantime, here’s a shot from last fall. This was taken very late in the afternoon from the shores of Lake Colchuck, which is outside Leavenworth, Washington. Those larches looked nice, with the last few rays of sunshine illuminating them on that rugged ridge way up there. It’s kind of a recurring theme about last fall, but I wasn’t expecting to see the larches changing color yet, I thought it was still 2 or 3 weeks early for that. On this hike in particular, I didn’t get to get up close and personal with any of them (although on the hike I did the next weekend, I did), so I had to settle for seeing them up on the surrounding mountains. But still, it was a nice sight.

Notes: Canon EOS Rebel T1i, Canon 55-250mm IS lens. 1/500s, f/9.0, ISO 400. Focal length: 179mm.

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October 12, 2010 – Colchuck Lake

Colchuck Lake

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

http://davefry.net/rate/index.php?viewimage=1922

Over the past few weeks I seem to be posting a lot of recent pictures, more so than normal. That’s probably because, at least in my mind, this time of year is primetime for me. I absolutely love the fall, I think in general things are more beautiful now than at any other time. The colors change, the temperature’s perfect, the snow has finally melted enough so you can get to the high country, the bugs are gone, and even the humidity drops so you don’t get as much haze. It’s fantastic! One of these years I’m totally going to leave my schedule open so I can take a few days off at a moment’s notice and head up to the hills whenever the weather’s going to be nice. Not this year, unfortunately. But maybe next year.

I’ve already posted two pictures recently from the hike up to this point, so now you get to look at the reward that you get at the end of the trail: Colchuck Lake. The two peaks you see at the end of the lake, in no particular order, are Colchuck Peak and Dragontail Peak. I’m not sure what the name of the one that’s lit up there on the left is. That’s the Colchuck Glacier (the primary water source for this lake I think) between the two peaks there in the distance. It’s tough to see it through the reflection, but this lake (like many lakes in the high country) is very green and milky, due to silty deposits from glacial meltwater.

Sadly, I only had time for a dayhike, and I had stayed up until 2 am the night before picking just the right trail. But, I feel like I picked a winner, although it would have been great had I been able to stay overnight and see what this place looked like just before sunset and just after sunrise. Oh well, next year, right? I timed it intentionally so that I’d get to this spot with just about an hour and a half of daylight left, because that’s when the light starts getting good. So that at least worked out for me, although it made the hike back to the car a bit dicey. Also, I only had about 10 or 20 minutes to hang out at the lake proper before I had to head out, which meant I couldn’t explore much. I basically got to see the view from the end of the lake, then I had to turn tail and run. But man, it was worth it.

Okay, that’s it for today!

Notes: Canon EOS Rebel T1i, Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens. 1/40s, f/11.0, ISO 400. Focal length: 11mm.

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